Reader Reviews for The Golden Palace

 

On Twitter: David Buchan - The Golden Palace by @TomVMorris is Philosophy 101, Indiana Jones, and The Da Vinci Code all rolled into one.

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Hi Tom! I just finished The Golden Palace on our trip to Singapore. I couldn’t put it down, I loved it so much. And I want to re-read it again to let it all sink in. I am enjoying these books so much! I love how you mix a great story with Philosophy and life lessons- oh and the Math and physics- loved that.  When is the next one going to be available? I can’t wait!
Tasha Moffitt, Executive Director, The Wahl Group, INC.
http://www.theartofvision.com

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5 Stars! Uncle Ali shares the wisdom of the ancients with Walid and teaches him how to better cope with what life throws his way. By Martha Slessman on May 9, 2016 Format: Paperback

Dr. Tom Morris continues to enthrall us with the newest book in the Oasis Series, THE GOLDEN PALACE, A Journey of New Beginnings. Dr. Morris states this series is his first attempt at fiction and he has nailed it at the get go. In the prologue to the series, The Oasis Within, we follow Walid and his beloved Uncle Ali, through a desert journey with a mysterious destination. Along the way, Uncle Ali shares the wisdom of the ancients with Walid and teaches him how to better cope with what life throws his way. In THE GOLDEN PALACE, Uncle Ali and Walid have arrived at their destination and Walid discovers the full secret of their journey.

In this work, Dr. Morris adds a very colorful character, Mafulla, and he indeed brings extra color to the pages of this work. His humor and instincts supply a broadening of experiences for Walid. There are also some young ladies Walid's age, and some older women who come into the story, and I suspect that their role in the overall adventure will expand in important ways.

The writing within these pages is rhythmic and full of imagery. The wisdom within this work provides its readers with thought provoking advice. My favorite is when Uncle Ali is speaking, “Men plan and God smiles.” Indeed…we must all plan for the unexpected as anything can happen at any given time. Without a plan, we panic and often take the wrong path. Through the words of Uncle Ali, Dr. Morris fills these pages with advice we can utilize to our advantage in our everyday lives.

This reviewer cannot wait for the next book in this new series. If you plan to keep your own copy of this work in pristine condition—don’t. Your highlighter will get a workout as you read. Whether you are 8 or 80 years of age, this work will be great reading and one that will have a life in your hands, not on your bookshelf.

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5 Stars! The New Series of Novels by Philosopher Tom Morris is a Great Read! M. Austin on February 17, 2016

This first book in a new series of novels by philosopher Tom Morris is a great read! Many philosophers, including myself, have worked at getting philosophical ideas out to the general public through publishing books showing the presence of philosophy in popular culture (movies, music, sports). But this series might be the best way to do that, because the philosophical insights come in the context of a compelling and interesting story. Their importance for a life well-lived is illustrated in the lives of the characters on the page. I highly recommend this book.

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5 Stars! A Philosophical Tale. By DKO on February 9, 2016

This exotic tale is at heart a coming of age story, with the two young men at the center of its twisting plot getting right to the cusp of adulthood at the end. A story of budding romance parallels the story of political intrigue and revolution: the special energy of the crush Walid has on Kissa interprets and is interpreted by the focus of mind and talent provoked by the political intrigue. The two boys are part of an adult world that they perceive, but can't yet fully appreciate. They are fortunate to have loving and insightful teachers, so that when adult experience comes, they are ready to grow into it; but as bravely as they face adult challenges, they are still mostly hoping, like a young soldier hoping he is courageous in his first battle. Even the actions they do undertake have about them a whiff of a boy's adventure, rather than a man's responsibility. To pick up a theme that, if I remember correctly, the character Bancom articulates, these two young men are still building the habits for adult action. This passage from boyhood adventure to adult responsibility seems to me the moral heart of this engaging tale.

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The Golden Palace is a rich feast, baking the ancient wisdom of Plato and Aristotle into the timeless adventure of Lawrence of Arabia. Tom Morris serves up that wisdom and adventure in a coming of age story as contemporary as Harry Potter, but with this intriguing twist: the true instrument of magic is not a wand, but the mind. David O’Connor, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame, and author of Plato’s Bedroom: Ancient Wisdom and Modern Love.

A boy named Walid, his uncle Ali, and a conversation while on caravan to market ... But as from simple seeds grow mighty and ageless trees, the tale of this boy’s true destiny is unfurled with remarkable mastery by the vivid imagination and seasoned storytelling of Tom Morris. As in one of a myriad of strikingly memorable quotes from the novel—‘Power is multiplied by purpose’—Morris’ story is a dynamic one whose purpose to entertain is elevated into the stratosphere by a philosopher’s desire to illuminate. Palace intrigue and irrational numbers, hidden identities and secret societies, young romance and ruminations on morality are all effortlessly interwoven into an adventure that is equal parts intriguing and enlightening. This is a book for the ages—readers will surely return to it throughout the many stages of their lives, each time savoring what they’ve gleaned before and pondering the new revelations a fresh perspective will bring. Stephen Susco, screenwriter/producer of The Grudge, The Grudge 2, The Possession, Red, and Beyond the Reach